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User and Contributor Manual




Locality Hierarchies and Naming Conventions


When contributing information related to localities, it is critical that you place a locality within the correct hierarchy, as well as follow the established rules for formatting and abbreviations. This creates consistency within the mindat.org database and ensures that your contributions are a useful addition to the database.


Locality Hierarchies


Locality hierarchies are a way of designating more specific locations that fall within larger, more general locations. The mindat.org hierarchies follow a format where the left-most entry in a location string is the most specific level, and each location moving towards the right is a more general level that encompasses the previous listings.

Locality levels are divided in respect to the political boundaries in any given country – this means there is some variety between countries, as the level below the country itself could represent a province, state, county, or other category depending on the organization in that country.

Normally the most specific level refers to a mine or quarry – however, this may occasionally be subdivided into shafts, veins, or stopes, although this practice is discouraged except for instances where the distinction is of significance. Significance may be defined by unique mineralogy or historical importance (ex: the Trotter shaft of the Franklin Mine, which is the type locality of bementite; levels within the Gold Hill Mine, Utah which produced different minerals; etc.).

Similarly, the most general level typically refers to a country – however, in situations such as Antarctica, ocean bottoms (which have specific locality pages reserved for that purpose), and other planets, the country division does not apply. Geologic formation/structure names should not be used in locality strings except when absolutely necessary.

Localities should always be listed within the appropriate hierarchy – a listing such as “Randall Mine, South Africa” does not give any clear indication of where a mine is located within South Africa. Occasionally, and especially in descriptions found in older literature, this may be all the information available. In this situation, locate the most specific locality possible in the hierarchy. In some cases it may only be possible to list at the country level.

If a locality is known by more than one name, an alternate name should be added to the locality rather than creating a separate locality. This can include localities that have changed names due to changes in ownership or consolidation of mining companies, as well as localities that have a formal name and a popular local name. The primary name should be the current name, unless it is better known by a historical name (ex. Chimney Rock Quarry, New Jersey; Nelly James Mine, Arizona). Alternate names should be placed in parentheses following the primary name with semi colons between multiple alternate names. - see below for formatting guidelines.

The word "near," or any similar words, should not be used in the locality name. This information can be added as part of the locality description where the specifics "near" and description of what "near" means in terms of direction and/or distance can be added.


Political Subdivisions


Within the mindat database, localities are described in a manner where political subdivisions have priority over geological or mining area designations. Localities are listed under current political subdivisions. If there is an older name, it can be incorporated as an alternate name. In order to address issues regarding unstable political boundaries, changes will only be recognized when a) a new political boundary has been recognized worldwide or b) an unrecognized boundary has been established for a period of five years.

However, since geology has little regard for the lines people like to draw on maps, there are times when a locality will span across multiple political boundaries (ex.: the Viburnum Trend District, located in Reynolds, Iron, Washington, and Madison Co., Missouri), is a historical region that has been subdivided into a number of new entities (ex.: the Transvaal in South Africa has become a number of different provinces), or other situations that require special handling in their placement within the locality hierarchy.

There are two methods to handling how to place these localities in the locality hierarchy system: 1) using Placeholders or 2) using Regions.

If you are adding a locality that needs special handling, please describe the situation in a post to the Mistakes section in the Messageboard so that a mindat.org manager can assist you in doing this correctly.



Formatting Rules



Levels of a hierarchy are separated by a comma followed by a single space.

Aga Khan Mine, Poona, Cue Shire, Western Australia, Australia


Alternate names are enclosed in parentheses - (). If more than one alternate name is listed, these are separated by semicolons- ;.

Fäld (Imfeld; Im Feld; Feld), Binn Valley, Wallis (Valais), Switzerland


Alternate names are listed out in full in parenthesis after the locality string element to which they pertain; alternate names are not placed in between words of the locality string.

CORRECT: Lily Mine (Lilly Mine), Pisco Umay, Ica Department, Peru


INCORRECT: Lily (Lilly) Mine, Pisco Umay, Ica Department, Peru


"Mine" and "Quarry" are the only descriptive locality words that are capitalized - shaft, tunnel, prospect, diggings, claim, adit, pit, deposit, vein, and similar terms are never capitalized.

Beryllium Virgin claim, Paramount Canyon, Sierra Co., New Mexico, USA


Tabor tunnel, Sežana, Slovenia


Auzon vein, Auzon, Haute-Loire, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France


"Mine" and "quarry" are only capitalized when part of a formal name.

Las Palomas Quarry, Coronel Pringles Department, San Luis, Argentina


Unnamed serpentine quarry, San Juan, Mendoza, Argentina


"Mountains" is always abbreviated "Mts" for a mountain range. If the word “Mountains” is part of a mine or district name, it is spelled out.

El Paso Mountains District, El Paso Mts, Kern Co., California, USA


If there is more than one locality in the area,, they should be designated by number within brackets - [ ].

ONLY alternate names are included in parentheses. However, brackets can be used to clarify otherwise confusing localities, including numbered localities (multiple places or features within a county level element with identical names) and descriptives such as "town," "stream," or similar terms to distinguish between identical names that may cause confusion (e.g.: "Largo Lake [town], Largo Lake [lake], Buford Mts"; or "Sutter Canyon [town], Sutter Canyon [valley], Bigload Mts").

Unnamed prospect [1], South Mountain, Santa Fe Co., New Mexico, USA


Unnamed prospect [2], South Mountain, Santa Fe Co., New Mexico, USA


If you are entering a locality that has produced only specimens from the slag of smelters, you should include “slag locality” after the primary name.

Baratti slag locality, Piombino, Livorno Province, Tuscany, Italy


Road cuts and localities along waterways should be listed under the nearest locality in the hierarchy and the route number (road name) included in the name.

US Highway 101 roadcut, Healdsburg, Sonoma Co., California, USA


State Route 111 road cuts, Long Hill, Trumbull, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, USA


Details such as which side of the road/waterway the locality is located and the kilometer or mile marker(s) involved should be added in the locality description, not in the locality name. Examples of descriptions for road cut localities are as follows:
  • South side of Autobahn A4, km marker 225.
  • North side of US highway 223, between mile markers 134 & 135.
  • Intersection of US highway 213 and Interstate highway 35, along ramp from eastbound highway 213 to northbound interstate 35.

In the United States, waterways have mile markers that can be found on USGS topo maps. In Europe, the Rhein River & other rivers have km markers along their courses and can be used where necessary. Examples of descriptions for waterway localities are as follows:
  • North side of Middle Fork American River, just upstream of river mile 104.
  • Midstream between river mile markers 109 & 110, Middle Fork American River.

Abbreviations:


Mindat.org discourages the use of abbreviations. All data entered, including references, should be spelled out in full except for a limited set of authorized abbreviations that should always be abbreviated - these are listed below. In order to maintain consistency across the database, the following rules for usage of abbreviations MUST be adhered to.

The following is a complete list of standard locality abbreviations and common abbreviations found in locality files, as used in mindat.org. You should always use these abbreviations. DO NOT use your own abbreviations.

Note: If the last letter of the abbreviation is NOT the last letter of the word it is abbreviating, it is followed by a dot (.) - so "mountains" is abbreviated as Mts (without a dot), but "county" is abbreviated as Co. (with a dot).

Words that ARE abbreviated:



  • Co. - county
  • GNIS - Geographic Names Identification System, a USGS database of correct & alternate place names
  • MRDS - Mineral Resources Data System (A USGS database listing most recognized deposits)
  • Mts – mountains
  • No. - number
  • St – Saint
  • Ste – Sainte (in French locality names)
  • twp – township
  • UK – United Kingdom
  • USA – United States of America
  • USGS - United States Geological Survey


Words that are NOT abbreviated:



  • Quarry (NOT Qy)
  • Level (NOT Lv or Lvl)
  • Wheal (Cornish mines – NOT abbreviated to W. or Wh.)


Abbreviations and symbols unique to a country or region should NOT be used in text within the description block - do NOT use any symbols or abbreviations that might not be easily understood throughout the world. Examples are as follows:

  • Do NOT use " ° " or " ' " for foot/feet.
  • Do NOT use " " " for inches.
  • Do NOT use "lbs." for pounds.
  • Do NOT use "oz" fo ounces.
  • Do NOT use "t" for ton.
  • Do NOT use "m" for meter.


Dimensions, depths, and distances should be given in metric terms as well as US terms whenever possible. Please remember that the mindat.org database is used worldwide and needs to be understood across all communities.


Diacritical Marks


There are a number of diacritically marked letters that are used in non-English alphabets. These characters should be used in the locality string.

Mindat.org supports the full unicode character set (including European, East European, Greek, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, and other character sets); however, not all browsers will be able to display all the characters you enter. We request that you enter these characters as accurately as you can – do not “westernize” locality names. In the case of non-western alphabets (Greek, Russian, & Asian character sets), a transliteration to a western style is required – this should be based on standard conventions for transliteration (for Chinese, use the PinYin system of transliteration; for South Korea, use the “new Hangeul system”).

The simplest way of entering these if they are not available on your keyboard is to copy and paste them into the locality name string, or use the "character map" tool found in MS Windows.

You can also use the mindat.org Full Extended Character Chart (needs to be re-posted somewhere if we want to keep using this - separate article?) to access many characters, as well as view their HTML name code, HMTL number code, MacOS and Windows shortcuts, and description.


Meteorites


Meteorites pose a special problem. In the majority of cases the mineralogy of the meteorite is completely unconnected to the mineralogy of the area, it is just a matter of chance as to where it falls. In some cases though the meteorite impact can dramatically change the mineralogy of the area where it lands, so rather than classing Meteorites as a special case with their own top-level category, we have decided to integrate them with the regional mineralogies of the countries and regions in which they are found.

Note that all meteorite files MUST have the word "meteorite" in the locality string.
This makes it possible to find all meteorites on mindat.org by doing a locality search with "meteorite" as a parameter.

Meteorite entries should be entered in the mindat.org database using the nomenclature established by the Meteoritical Society and using the following format:

[Official Name] meteorite [meteorite abbreviation]


Allan Hills A76004 meteorite (ALHA76004)


If you need to verify the nomenclature of a meteorite, please refer to the Meteoritical Bulletin Database.

For Martian or lunar meteorites, please add this as an adjective before the term meteorite. This makes it possible to search specifically for Martian or lunar meteorites.

Dhofar 019 Martian meteorite


In some cases the official meteorite name contains parentheses, and this is the only case within mindat.org locality names where it is acceptable to include parentheses inside the name rather than at the end. For example:

Albin (pallasite) meteorite, Laramie Co., Wyoming, USA




All meteorite names should be followed by regional information in the normal manner.

Allan Hills A76004 meteorite (ALHA76004), Victoria Land, Antarctica


Meteorites from Northwest Africa without a more specific locality should be added in this format:

Northwest Africa 1934 meteorite (NWA 1934), Northwest Africa Meteorites




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