Chalcopyrite, Sphalerite, Quartz

Specimen ID: R5U-WRF

Mineral(s)
Chalcopyrite : CuFeS2
Quartz : SiO2
Locality
Mindat locality:
Dimensions
10.7cm x 7.1cm x 6.7cm
Events

Photo added to mindat.org

10.7 x 7.1 x 6.7 cm A very hard-to-find specimen from the old Bufa Mine in Mexico featuring some excellent quality, sharp, brassy, metallic, well-formed crystals of chalcopyrite measuring up to 8 mm sitting on prismatic quartz with associated black sphalerite. I've only seen a few chalcopyrites from this locality, but this piece is noteworthy because the crystals are not tightly intergrown, but rather isolated on the quartz, giving them distinction. This piece comes from the collection of Hal Miller formerly of Boulder, Colorado. Hal was a chemist, a well-known collector, mineral & mining enthusiast, and he actually worked on the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. Hal along with Richard Kosnar also co-wrote the "Colorado Mineral Belt" article in the "Colorado I" issue of Mineralogical Record in 1976.
Brian Kosnar - 17th August 2019

Photo added to mindat.org

10.7 x 7.1 x 6.7 cm A very hard-to-find specimen from the old Bufa Mine in Mexico featuring some excellent quality, sharp, brassy, metallic, well-formed crystals of chalcopyrite measuring up to 8 mm sitting on prismatic quartz with associated black sphalerite. I've only seen a few chalcopyrites from this locality, but this piece is noteworthy because the crystals are not tightly intergrown, but rather isolated on the quartz, giving them distinction. This piece comes from the collection of Hal Miller formerly of Boulder, Colorado. Hal was a chemist, a well-known collector, mineral & mining enthusiast, and he actually worked on the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. Hal along with Richard Kosnar also co-wrote the "Colorado Mineral Belt" article in the "Colorado I" issue of Mineralogical Record in 1976.
Brian Kosnar - 17th August 2019

Photo added to mindat.org

10.7 x 7.1 x 6.7 cm A very hard-to-find specimen from the old Bufa Mine in Mexico featuring some excellent quality, sharp, brassy, metallic, well-formed crystals of chalcopyrite measuring up to 8 mm sitting on prismatic quartz with associated black sphalerite. I've only seen a few chalcopyrites from this locality, but this piece is noteworthy because the crystals are not tightly intergrown, but rather isolated on the quartz, giving them distinction. This piece comes from the collection of Hal Miller formerly of Boulder, Colorado. Hal was a chemist, a well-known collector, mineral & mining enthusiast, and he actually worked on the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. Hal along with Richard Kosnar also co-wrote the "Colorado Mineral Belt" article in the "Colorado I" issue of Mineralogical Record in 1976.
Brian Kosnar - 17th August 2019

Photo added to mindat.org

10.7 x 7.1 x 6.7 cm A very hard-to-find specimen from the old Bufa Mine in Mexico featuring some excellent quality, sharp, brassy, metallic, well-formed crystals of chalcopyrite measuring up to 8 mm sitting on prismatic quartz with associated black sphalerite. I've only seen a few chalcopyrites from this locality, but this piece is noteworthy because the crystals are not tightly intergrown, but rather isolated on the quartz, giving them distinction. This piece comes from the collection of Hal Miller formerly of Boulder, Colorado. Hal was a chemist, a well-known collector, mineral & mining enthusiast, and he actually worked on the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. Hal along with Richard Kosnar also co-wrote the "Colorado Mineral Belt" article in the "Colorado I" issue of Mineralogical Record in 1976.
Brian Kosnar - 17th August 2019

Photo added to mindat.org

10.7 x 7.1 x 6.7 cm A very hard-to-find specimen from the old Bufa Mine in Mexico featuring some excellent quality, sharp, brassy, metallic, well-formed crystals of chalcopyrite measuring up to 8 mm sitting on prismatic quartz with associated black sphalerite. I've only seen a few chalcopyrites from this locality, but this piece is noteworthy because the crystals are not tightly intergrown, but rather isolated on the quartz, giving them distinction. This piece comes from the collection of Hal Miller formerly of Boulder, Colorado. Hal was a chemist, a well-known collector, mineral & mining enthusiast, and he actually worked on the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. Hal along with Richard Kosnar also co-wrote the "Colorado Mineral Belt" article in the "Colorado I" issue of Mineralogical Record in 1976.
Brian Kosnar - 17th August 2019
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